lamus-dworski

COSTUMES: early medieval Poland

lamus-dworski:

Various Slavic costumes (with the focus on dresses, jewellery and accessories) and a few ones of noticeable Viking influences. All pictures are from Rękawka 2014 - the annual Slavic festival at the Krakus Mound (Kopiec Krakusa) in Kraków, Poland. 

Photographs © Ilja Van de Pavert (ilvic), who catched a lot of temple rings (in Polish: kabłączki skroniowe and larger zausznice), very characteristic for the Slavs:

Here’s a nicely detailed Viking outfit:

More shots after the cut.

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todaysdocument
todaysdocument:

Forrest Gump at the Archives
Twenty years ago the film Forrest Gump was released in theaters on July 6, 1994.  In commemoration of the 20th anniversary, colleagues in the National Archives Media Preservation Lab have scoured NARA’s holdings to find a few examples of archival footage that made its way into the movie.
The original archival footage features a young man named Pelton Stewart. Stewart met Nixon in 1971 to be recognized as the Boys Club of America, “Boy of the Year.” The archival footage seen here comes from the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda, California. It is part of the Naval Photographic Center Film collection.
In the movie, Forrest is recognized as the U.S. Ping Pong team’s “Player of the Year”. After receiving the award, the president recommends that Forrest stay at the Watergate hotel. Unfortunately for Forrest, people in the office building across the street are looking for “a fuse box or somethin’” and their flashlights keep him awake. He suggests that maintenance man check it out.
See Media Matters » Forrest Gump at the Archives for more historical clips paired with their “Gumpized” versions.



Still images were taken from:  
Nixon Naval Photographic Center Film Collection. ID: 1211-050-71, Date: April 9, 1971
Forrest Gump (1994), Paramount Pictures.

todaysdocument:

Forrest Gump at the Archives

Twenty years ago the film Forrest Gump was released in theaters on July 6, 1994.  In commemoration of the 20th anniversary, colleagues in the National Archives Media Preservation Lab have scoured NARA’s holdings to find a few examples of archival footage that made its way into the movie.

The original archival footage features a young man named Pelton Stewart. Stewart met Nixon in 1971 to be recognized as the Boys Club of America, “Boy of the Year.” The archival footage seen here comes from the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda, California. It is part of the Naval Photographic Center Film collection.

In the movie, Forrest is recognized as the U.S. Ping Pong team’s “Player of the Year”. After receiving the award, the president recommends that Forrest stay at the Watergate hotel. Unfortunately for Forrest, people in the office building across the street are looking for “a fuse box or somethin’” and their flashlights keep him awake. He suggests that maintenance man check it out.

See Media Matters » Forrest Gump at the Archives for more historical clips paired with their “Gumpized” versions.

Still images were taken from:  

Nixon Naval Photographic Center Film Collection. ID: 1211-050-71, Date: April 9, 1971

Forrest Gump (1994), Paramount Pictures.

todaysdocument
todaysdocument:

Ready for the whitehouse's first ever Tumblr Q&A on education and college affordability?  
(Tune in at 4.pm. on whitehouse.tumblr.com!)
While you’re waiting, check out the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act - aka the G.I. Bill,  which enabled over 2 million servicemen to attend college and universities following World War II.  Also on display through July 14 at the National Archives!
(See also the Morrill Land-Grant Act, suggested by congressarchives as the most influential federal initiative in higher education.)
usnatarchives:

The GI Bill is on display in the East Rotunda Gallery of the National Archives Building now through July 14.

“With the signing of this bill a well-rounded program of special veterans’ benefits is nearly completed. It gives emphatic notice to the men and women in our armed forces that the American people do not intend to let them down.” President Franklin Roosevelt’s Statement on Signing the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act, June 22, 1944

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act into law on June 22, 1944, just days after the D-Day invasion of Normandy.
Also known as the GI Bill of Rights, it offered World War II veterans grants and loans for college and vocational education, unemployment insurance, and low interest loans for housing. The bill had unanimously passed both chambers of Congress in the spring of 1944.
The act put higher education, job training, and home ownership within the reach of millions of World War II veterans. By 1951, nearly 8 million veterans had received educational and training benefits, and 2.4 million had received $13 billion in Federal loans for homes, farms, and businesses.
Image: The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act (Public Law 78-346), approved July 22, 1944. National Archives, General Records of the United States Government.

todaysdocument:

Ready for the whitehouse's first ever Tumblr Q&A on education and college affordability?  

(Tune in at 4.pm. on whitehouse.tumblr.com!)

While you’re waiting, check out the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act - aka the G.I. Bill,  which enabled over 2 million servicemen to attend college and universities following World War II.  Also on display through July 14 at the National Archives!

(See also the Morrill Land-Grant Actsuggested by congressarchives as the most influential federal initiative in higher education.)

usnatarchives:

The GI Bill is on display in the East Rotunda Gallery of the National Archives Building now through July 14.

“With the signing of this bill a well-rounded program of special veterans’ benefits is nearly completed. It gives emphatic notice to the men and women in our armed forces that the American people do not intend to let them down.” President Franklin Roosevelt’s Statement on Signing the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act, June 22, 1944

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act into law on June 22, 1944, just days after the D-Day invasion of Normandy.

Also known as the GI Bill of Rights, it offered World War II veterans grants and loans for college and vocational education, unemployment insurance, and low interest loans for housing. The bill had unanimously passed both chambers of Congress in the spring of 1944.

The act put higher education, job training, and home ownership within the reach of millions of World War II veterans. By 1951, nearly 8 million veterans had received educational and training benefits, and 2.4 million had received $13 billion in Federal loans for homes, farms, and businesses.

Image: The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act (Public Law 78-346), approved July 22, 1944. National Archives, General Records of the United States Government.